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Geodatabases in PostgreSQL included with ArcGIS Enterprise on Amazon Web Services

If you use the ArcGIS Server (Ubuntu Linux) Amazon Machine Image (AMI) to create an ArcGIS Server site or ArcGIS Enterprise deployment from the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Management Console, you have the option to include a PostgreSQL database cluster. The database cluster can be on the ArcGIS Server instance or on a separate instance that is part of your ArcGIS Server site. If you use the ArcGIS Server (Ubuntu Linux or Windows) AMI from AWS Management Console or using an Esri sample AWS CloudFormation template, you have the option to include an Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) for PostgreSQL. If you use Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL, the RDS instance is always on a separate instance that is part of your ArcGIS Server site.

When you launch a stand-alone GIS Server site using one of the Esri CloudFormation templates and provide an ArcGIS GIS Server enterprise edition license, two geodatabases are created for you at 10.6—egdb and geodata. At 10.6.1, only the egdb geodatabase is created.

At 10.6, the egdb geodatabase is registered as the GIS Server site's managed database. When you publish feature or WFS-T services to a site that has a managed database, the data can be copied from the geodatabase that contains the map source data to the egdb geodatabase. This data is dependent on the service; when you delete the feature or WFS-T service, the data is deleted from the egdb geodatabase.

At 10.6.1, the egdb geodatabase is added as a registered database to the GIS Server site. You need to move data into this geodatabase to store data in it on AWS. When you publish services from this data or later delete these services, the data remains in the egdb geodatabase.

The geodata geodatabase created with 10.6 is intended for use as a replicated geodatabase. You can register the geodata geodatabase with the GIS Server site. When you do, designate the geodata geodatabase as a server database connection that is not the same as your publisher database connection (the publisher geodatabase being your on-premises enterprise geodatabase) and create a geodata service. You can replicate data from your on-premises enterprise geodatabase to the geodata geodatabase through the geodata service.

When you publish a feature or WFS-T service that includes the replicated data, edits made to the data through the feature service can be synchronized with the geodata service, updating the data in your on-premises enterprise geodatabase. Similarly, you can continue to edit your on-premises data and use the geodata service to synchronize those changes to the data in the geodata geodatabase.

PostgreSQL on AWS

PostgreSQL database clusters on AWS created from the Esri Ubuntu AMI in the AWS Management Console do not contain login roles or geodatabases. You must create them yourself.

If you included a PostgreSQL database cluster when you created a stand-alone ArcGIS GIS Server site using ArcGIS Server Cloud Builder on Amazon Web Services, the geodatabases contain the following login roles:

  • postgres: The database cluster administrator
  • sde: The geodatabase administrator*
  • owner: A user who owns a schema in the egdb and geodata databases and, therefore, can create data in them*

By default, the passwords for these users are as follows:

  • postgres = postgres
  • sde = E$ri3774*
  • owner = owner*

*These login roles are only created if you use ArcGIS Server Cloud Builder on Amazon Web Services to create your site.

To secure your site, you must log in to the instance that contains the PostgreSQL database cluster and change the passwords. See Change default PostgreSQL passwords for instructions.

Note:

10.6.1 is the last release of ArcGIS Server Cloud Builder on Amazon Web Services.

Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL

You can choose to use an Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) for PostgreSQL to store your ArcGIS web service data on Amazon.

Amazon RDS performs some database maintenance tasks so you don't have to. For example, RDS instances automatically apply database patches and create backups of your database. They are also designed to be highly available, as they can be run in multiple availability zones (referred to as multi-AZ deployments).

Multi-AZ deployments are the default deployment type for Amazon RDS instances; therefore, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL instances you launch using ArcGIS Enterprise on Amazon Web Services AMIs use this deployment.

Note:

Because they provide enhanced availability, Amazon recommends you use multi-AZ deployments for production systems. Be aware, though, that these deployments cost more to use per hour and for storage than other deployments. Consult Amazon's pricing guide for more information.

When you use Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL in your ArcGIS Server site on AWS, the Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL instance is always separate from your ArcGIS Server instance.

Geodatabases created in Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL store spatial data using the PostGIS geometry storage type.

When you use ArcGIS Server Cloud Builder on Amazon Web Services or a CloudFormation template provided by Esri to create an ArcGIS Server site, it creates the geodatabases described previously in this topic. The following users and passwords are also created:

  • sde (user) E$ri3774 (password): The geodatabase administrator
  • owner (user) owner (password): A user who owns a schema in the databases and, therefore, can create data in them

To secure your site, you must connect to Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL and change the passwords. See Change default PostgreSQL passwords for instructions.

Note:

10.6.1 is the last release of ArcGIS Server Cloud Builder on Amazon Web Services.

If you manually create your site using the Amazon Web Services console and want to use PostgreSQL RDS for data storage, you need to create your own geodatabases and users.